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Trump promises Americans ‘huge tax cut’ for Christmas

By DARLENE SUPERVILLE
Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump promised on Monday to deliver a tax overhaul by Christmas, making the pledge a day after the White House signaled its willingness to strike a health-care provision from Senate tax legislation if the provision is an impediment to passing the tax bill.

Speaking before a Cabinet meeting, Trump said: “We’re going to give the American people a huge tax cut for Christmas — hopefully that will be a great big, beautiful Christmas present.”

At issue is a provision that would repeal a requirement that Americans have health insurance or pay a fine. The provision is not in the version of the tax overhaul passed last week by the House but is in the bill the Senate Finance Committee has approved.

The proposal to repeal a central mandate of the Obama health law has emerged as a major sticking point for Republican Sen. Susan Collins of Maine, whose vote the White House needs. Collins said Sunday that the matter should be dealt with separately.

Striking the health-care provision would blow a big hole in the senators’ tax cut plan, leaving them $338 billion short of their revenue goal over the next 10 years.

Senators would have to find the money elsewhere to meet the goals set by the budget resolution passed by the Senate and House earlier this year. But so far, there is no consensus among senators on how to come up with the money.

Trump’s budget director, Mick Mulvaney, said the White House is open to scrapping the provision, which would repeal a central part of the health-care law enacted by President Barack Obama. Trump had pressed for the provision to be added to the bill, partly to show progress on the GOP’s goal of undoing the health care law following Congress’ failed attempts to repeal it earlier this year.

“I don’t think anybody doubts where the White House is on repealing and replacing Obamacare. We absolutely want to do it,” Mulvaney said Sunday. “If we can repeal part of Obamacare as part of a tax bill and have a tax bill that is still a good tax bill that can pass, that’s great.

“If it becomes an impediment to getting the best tax bill we can, then we’re OK with taking it out,” Mulvaney added.

Trump did not directly discuss the matter on Monday. He said the administration would concentrate on health care, infrastructure and welfare “soon after taxes.”

Marc Short, legislative director, said on Sunday that the White House “is very comfortable with the House bill,” which does not include the individual mandate. But Short also said the White House views the mandate as a tax and “we like the fact that the Senate has included it in its bill.”

Collins said Sunday that the tax advantage that some middle-income consumers would reap under the tax bill could be wiped out by repealing the mandate under the Affordable Care Act. She said they would face higher insurance premiums coupled with the loss of federal subsidies to help them afford coverage.

“The fact is that if you do pull this piece of the Affordable Care Act out, for some middle-income families, the increased premium is going to cancel out the tax cut that they would get,” Collins said.

Collins said she hasn’t decided how to vote on the bill because it will be amended before it reaches the Senate floor. But her vote is crucial in a chamber where Republicans hold a slim 52-48 advantage.

Last week, Sen. Ron Johnson of Wisconsin became the first Republican to declare his opposition to the plan, saying it wouldn’t reduce business taxes enough for partnerships and corporations. GOP Sens. Bob Corker of Tennessee, John McCain and Jeff Flake of Arizona, and Rand Paul of Kentucky have also expressed concerns.

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said the mandate amounts to “an unfair tax on poor people.”

“The president thinks we should get rid of it. I think we should get rid of it,” he said, but added: “We’re going to work with the Senate as we go through this.”

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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