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September existing home sales rise

A for sale sign is posted at a home in Glendale, Calif., recently. Sales of previously occupied homes rose in September to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 4.53 million, the National Association of Realtors reported Monday. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon)

A for sale sign is posted at a home in Glendale, Calif., recently. Sales of previously occupied homes rose in September to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 4.53 million, the National Association of Realtors reported Monday. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon)

By Alan Zibel
AP Business Writer

Washington — Sales of previously occupied homes rose last month after the worst summer for the housing market in more than a decade. And fears over flawed foreclosure documents could keep buyers on the sidelines in the final months of the year.

Sales increased 10 percent in September to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 4.53 million, according to the National Association of Realtors on Monday.

Home sales have declined 37.5 percent from their peak annual rate of 7.25 million in September 2005. They have risen from July’s rate of 3.84 million, which was the lowest in 15 years.

Most observers said they expect roughly 5 million homes to be sold in 2010. That would be in line with last year’s totals and just above sales for 2008, the worst since 1997.

Still, sales could fall further if potential lawsuits from former homeowners claiming that banks made errors when seizing their homes make consumers fearful of buying foreclosed properties.

In a survey taken by the Realtors group this month, about 23 percent of the 2,000 agents surveyed responded they have a client who is no longer interested in buying a foreclosed property because of the foreclosure-document mess.

“You’re going to see uncertainty on the part of homebuyers,” said Quinn Eddins, director of research at Radar Logic Inc., which tracks the housing market.

Mortgage applications to buy homes last week were 29 percent below the same week a year ago, according to the Mortgage Bankers Association. At that time, buyers were rushing to purchase homes to qualify for federal tax credits.

Last month the inventory of unsold homes on the market fell about 2 percent to 4 million. That’s a 10.8-month supply at the current sales pace. It compares with a healthy level of about six months.

Dubious mortgage practices and lax lending standards were blamed for contributing to a housing bubble that eventually burst and thrust the economy from 2007-09 into the worst recession since the 1930s. Many Americans took out home loans that they didn’t understand and bought homes that they couldn’t afford.

As a result, foreclosures have soared to record highs. It’s one of the negative forces restraining the economy’s ability to get back on sounder footing.

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