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Projects aim to reduce runoff into Green Bay

Green Bay Metropolitan Sewerage District water resources specialist Tracy Valenta and water resources technician Andy Pierre retrieve water quality monitoring sondes from the bay of Green Bay, Wis. Wisconsin farmers have been asked to participate in studies aimed at reducing phosphorus runoff blamed for a growing dead zone in Green Bay. The area is called a dead zone because the water no longer contains enough oxygen to support fish and other living organisms. The situation is reversible, but fixing it could take 20 or more years. (AP Photo/The Green Bay Press-Gazette, H. Marc Larson)

Green Bay Metropolitan Sewerage District water resources specialist Tracy Valenta and water resources technician Andy Pierre retrieve water quality monitoring sondes from the bay of Green Bay in August. Wisconsin farmers have been asked to participate in studies aimed at reducing phosphorus runoff blamed for a growing dead zone in Green Bay. (AP Photo/The Green Bay Press-Gazette, H. Marc Larson)

GREEN BAY, Wis. (AP) — Wisconsin farmers are being asked to participate in studies aimed at reducing phosphorus runoff into Green Bay.

Scientists say phosphorus is the cause of a growing dead zone found in the bay. Water in that area does not contain enough oxygen to support fish and other living organisms.

Press-Gazette Media reports the situation is reversible, but it could take decades to fix.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture and Great Lakes Commission are funding a $1 million, five-year project in which a handful of farmers will experiment with techniques to reduce phosphorus runoff. Other farmers will be able to see how well those methods work.

The Green Bay sewerage district and Oneida Tribe of Indians are starting a second project aimed at identifying the most cost-effective way of reducing phosphorus.

Information from: Press-Gazette Media, http://www.greenbaypressgazette.com

Copyright 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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