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Moore takes baby steps into family business

Austin Moore - Moore Construction (Staff photo by Kevin Harnack)

Austin Moore – Moore Construction (Staff photo by Kevin Harnack)

Before Austin Moore could even walk, he was visiting construction sites with his dad.

“I always was drawn to construction and trucks growing up, like a lot of little boys are,” Austin said. When he worked on a residential project with his dad during his sophomore year of high school, the experience solidified his desire to one day follow in his father’s footsteps.

“That was the turning point,” Austin said. “I liked being able to start something, see progress and complete a task, being able to look at it and touch it and feel it.”

Today, Austin works as a project manager at his father’s company, Moore Construction Services. Austin began working there for his college co-op not long after his father started the company in 2008. Today, Austin’s duties range from providing estimates to managing contracts and keeping projects on budget.

At Moore Construction, Austin has worked with clients in many industries. One of his most memorable projects was for the Wauwatosa School District. Austin submitted a bid on Moore’s behalf for the project in 2015, ultimately winning $500,000 in business. That work eventually led to a multimillion contract between Moore and the school district for 17 projects on seven district buildings.

“That’s probably my crowning career moment to this point,” Austin said. “Even though it’s not the biggest project I’ve been on, it’s one I took from planting the seed to harvesting it.”

Mike Moore, president of Moore Construction and Austin’s father, says he’s glad to have his son on his team.

“Austin has earned his leadership role through dedication and hard work,” Mike said. “He is committed to our clients and our team.”

Austin says he’s happy to work alongside his father as Moore Construction continues to add to its client roster. Eventually, he hopes to take over the company, and he’s not worried about a “second-generation jinx.” Having been at the company in its earliest days, Austin is well aware of both the benefits and the difficulties that can come with a family business.

“I feel fortunate that I was able to be around for a lot of the growing pains at the early part of my career,” Austin said. “I feel like I’m more the one-and-a-half generation and not the second generation.”

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