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Home / Commercial Construction / Komatsu picks Hunzinger, Graef, Eppstein Uhen to build, design waterfront HQ

Komatsu picks Hunzinger, Graef, Eppstein Uhen to build, design waterfront HQ

A rendering showing the headquarters building Komastu Mining Corp.plans to have built in Milwaukee's harbor district.

A rendering showing the headquarters building Komastu Mining Corp.plans to have built in Milwaukee’s harbor district.

Komatsu Mining Corp. has tapped a trio of Milwaukee-area contractors to build its new headquarters in the city’s harbor district.

The company has selected the general contractor Hunzinger Construction, of Brookfield, and the engineering firms Graef and Eppstein Uhen Architects, both of Milwaukee, for the construction and design of Komatsu’s planned waterfront headquarters, in Milwaukee’s Harbor District. A Komatsu spokeswoman confirmed the selection of the contractors on Friday.

The manufacturer of mining equipment hopes to begin work on its $285 million headquarters later this year. It first announced it would move from its current site in West Milwaukee to the former Solvay Coke, on the city’s lakefront, in late September. Komatsu’s plans include a 410,000-square-foot manufacturing plant and a 170,000-square-foot office building. City officials have previously said it would most likely be the largest ongoing urban industrial-development project in the country.

The company has said the new plant would employ nearly 600 workers by 2023. To support the project, the company stands to get as much as $40 million in tax and other incentives from the city. The city’s agreement with the company requires 25 percent of the resulting construction contracts to go to small businesses owned by women, minorities and veterans, and 40 percent of the hours worked on the project to go to Milwaukee residents. The Wisconsin Economic Development Corp. is also contributing as much as $59.5 million.

Local officials are heralding the project as a revitalization of Milwaukee’s industrial Harbor District, which had languished for years after manufacturers had fled the central city. The city of Milwaukee’s is planning to spend $15 million on a riverwalk that would loop the Komatsu plant. Also, the utility contractor Michels Corp. announced plans last summer to build a mixed-use development nearby that could ultimately cost $100 million.

The Komatsu and Michels project combined could bring more than $330 million in investment to the city’s Harbor District.

About Nate Beck, nbeck@dailyreporter.com

Nate Beck is The Daily Reporter's construction staff writer. He can be reached at (414) 225-1814 (office) or 414-388-5635 (mobile).

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