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Home / Government / Pentagon defers 127 building projects to pay for border wall (UPDATE)

Pentagon defers 127 building projects to pay for border wall (UPDATE)

Construction crews on March 11 replace a section of the primary wall separating San Diego, above right, and Tijuana, Mexico, below left. Defense Secretary Mark Esper has approved the use of $3.6 billion from military construction projects to build 175 miles of President Donald Trump’s wall along the Mexican border. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull, File)

Construction crews on March 11 replace a section of the primary wall separating San Diego, above right, and Tijuana, Mexico, below left. Defense Secretary Mark Esper has approved the use of $3.6 billion from military construction projects to build 175 miles of President Donald Trump’s wall along the Mexican border. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull, File)

By LOLITA C. BALDOR
Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — Defense Secretary Mark Esper approved the use of $3.6 billion from military construction projects to build 175 miles of President Donald Trump’s wall along the Mexican border.

Among the projects that stand to lose money is a proposed $8 million small-arms range at Truax Field airforce base in Dane County.

Pentagon officials would not officially confirm which 127 projects will be affected but said details will be available after members of Congress are notified. They said half the money will come from military projects in the U.S. and the rest will come from projects in other countries.

Esper’s decision on Tuesday is sure to stoke what has been a persistent controversy between the Trump administration and Congress over immigration policies and money for the proposed border wall. And it sets up a difficult debate for lawmakers who refused earlier this year to approve nearly $6 billion for the wall but now must decide if they will refund the projects that are being used to provide the money.

Elaine McCusker, the Pentagon comptroller, said the now-unfunded projects are not being canceled. Instead, the Pentagon is saying the military projects are being “deferred.” The Defense Department, however, has no guarantee from Congress that any of the money will be replaced, and a number of lawmakers made it clear during the debate earlier this year that they would not fall for budget trickery and sleight of hand to build the wall.

“It is a slap in the face to the members of the Armed Forces who serve our country that President Trump is willing to cannibalize already allocated military funding to boost his own ego and for a wall he promised Mexico would pay to build,” said Senate Democratic Leader Chuck Schumer of New York. He said the funding shift will affect the U.S. Military Academy at West Point.

Congress approved $1.375 billion for wall construction in this year’s budget, the same amount as the previous year and far less than the $5.7 billion that the White House had sought. Trump grudgingly accepted the money to end a 35-day government shutdown in February but simultaneously declared a national emergency to take money from other government accounts, identifying up to $8.1 billion for wall construction.

The transferred funds include $600 million from the Treasury Department’s asset forfeiture fund, $2.5 billion from Defense Department counterdrug activities and now the $3.6 billion pot for military housing construction announced Tuesday.

The Pentagon reviewed the list of military projects and said none that provided housing or critical infrastructure for troops would be affected, in the wake of recent scandals over poor living quarters for service members in several parts of the country. Defense officials also said they would focus on projects set to begin in 2020 and beyond, with the hope that the money could eventually be restored by Congress.

“Canceling military construction projects at home and abroad will undermine our national security and the quality of life and morale of our troops, making America less secure,” said House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, a California Democrat.

The government will spend the military housing money on 11 wall projects in California, Arizona and Texas, the administration said in a filing Tuesday in a lawsuit brought by the American Civil Liberties Union. The most expensive is for 52 miles in Laredo, Texas, at a cost of $1.27 billion.

The Laredo project and one in El Centro, California, are on private property, and building them would require purchases or confiscation, according to the court filing. Two projects in Arizona are on land overseen by the Navy and will be the first to be built, no earlier than Oct. 3. And seven are at least partly on federal land overseen by the Interior Department.

The 175 miles covered in the Pentagon’s plans would be just a small fraction of the 1,954-mile U.S.-Mexico border.

Army Lt. Gen. Andrew Poppas, director of operations for the Joint Staff, told reporters that shoring up the wall could eventually lead to a reduction in the number of troops who are deployed along the border. About 3,000 active-duty troops and 2,000 members of the National Guard are being used along the border to support Homeland Security and border patrol efforts. About 1,200 of the active-duty troops are conducting surveillance in mobile truck units.

Poppas and other officials couldn’t say how soon or by how many the troop numbers could go down. The Pentagon spokesman Jonathan Hoffman said the troops would remain at the border for as long as they are needed. The length of their deployment could depend in part on the number of attempted border crossings by migrants and other issues.

The ACLU said Tuesday that it would seek a court order to block attempts to spend the military money. It sued earlier over the use of Defense Department counter-drug money, but the Supreme Court lifted a spending freeze on that money in July, allowing the first Pentagon-funded wall project to break ground last month in Arizona.

The ACLU attorney Dror Ladin said, “We’ll be back in court very soon to block Trump’s latest effort to raid military funds for his xenophobic wall.”

Copyright 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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